Past HLR Survey & Research

Academy of Natural Sciences Biological Surveys

From 2008 through 2011, the Academy of Natural Sciences (ANS) conducted bio- inventory and ecological assessments at HLR, mainly in the riparian areas of Kimball and Dry Fork Creeks. ANS studied riparian plants, insects, birds and other taxa to determine ecological condition, assess ecological responses to ranch activities such as pond and marsh creation and assist in restoration planning. ANS assessed habitat and temperature suitability of Kimball Creek for Colorado River Cutthroat Trout. ANS scientists have also measured rates of bank erosion in Kimball Creek, to understand historical and ongoing channel processes, and to relate riparian ecological condition to channel shape. ANS work on the HLR was completed in 2012 with the development of checklists of the local fauna and flora for ranch guests, staff, and scientists and the submission of data and a final report in 2012.

Garfield-Mesa Lion Project

From 2011-2012, HLR contracted with Mark Elbroch, then a PhD student at UC Davis, to capture and collar cougars, track them to their kill sites, determine what was killed and what happened to the prey following the kill. Dr. Elbroch, PhD, was Principal Investigator on this project. It was both an intensive study of cougar feeding ecology on and around the HLR, and research on the role cougars play in their larger ecological communities. Dr. Elbroch analyzed data collected and filed a final report on the project in early summer 2013.

Mark Elbroch, PhD, was Principal Investigator on the HLR Garfield-Mesa Lion Project. This project was both an intensive study of cougar feeding ecology on and around the HLR, and research on the role cougars play in their larger ecological communities. Mark’s doctorate in Ecology at UC Davis focused on cougars in Chilean Patagonia.